Galerie Varsakis - paintings
Over the past years, Harris Varsakis has created a big collection of beautiful and intriguing paintings. These pantings have been reproduced using laser printing on canvas, others by silk print in a limited and numbered edition. Both can be ordered on line.



Adonis, in Greek mythology, is the symbol of beauty and desire. He is a central figure in various mystery religions. His religion belonged to women.
He is an annually-renewed, ever-youthful vegetation god, a life-death-rebirth-deity whose nature is tied to the calendar. His name is often applied in modern times to handsome youths, of whom he is the archetype.
The central myth in its Greek telling mentions that Aphrodite fell in love with the beautiful youth. She sheltered Adonis as a new-born baby and entrusted him to Persephone.
Persephone was also taken by Adonis' beauty and refused to give him back to Aphrodite. The dispute between the two goddesses was settled by Zeus: Adonis was to spend one-third of every year with each goddess and the last third wherever he chose. He chose to spend two-thirds of the year with Aphrodite.
Adonis was killed by a wild boar, sent by Artemis, who was jealously in love with him herself. But because  she had vowed to remain a virgin, she could not have him.
He died in Aphrodite’s arms.




Aeolus in Greek mythology was the god of the winds
 
He lived on the floating island of Aeolia, where he was visited by Odysseus and his crew on their way back from Troje to Ithaca. He gave them hospitality for a month and provided for a west wind to bring them home fast and safely.
He also offered them a bag containing all winds but the west. Unfortunately, just before they reached Ithaca, Odysseus’ crew foolishly opened this bag and the winds blew them back to Aeolia.
Aeolus refused them further help because he believed that their short and unsuccessful voyage meant that the gods did not favour them.




Prometheus, the Titan who stole fire from the Gods and gave it to mankind, became the victim of Zeus’ anger. Zeus decided to punish Prometheus by chaining him to a rock in the Caucasus. Furthermore he sent an eagle to eat his liver every day. Due to Prometheus’ immortality, the liver was regenerated every night, only to serve as a fresh meal for the eagle the next day. 
This painting shows how the total freedom of capital (Milton Friedman’s dogma) results in the anarcho-capitalists’ savoring the liver of people worldwide





Aphrodite was the Greek goddess of love, beauty and sexuality.

Zeus realized that her unequaled beauty might become the cause of violence between the other Gods and married her off to Hephaestus, the lame god of fire and craftmanship.

Aphrodite possessed the mythical apple from the garden of the Hesperides, which shows a parallel to the story of Eve.









Daphne (meaning Laurel) is  known in Greek mythology as a Naiad - a type of female nymph associated with fountains, wells, springs, streams, brooks and other types of freshwater.
Because of her beauty, Daphne attracted the attention and lust of the god Apollo.
Apollo pursued her and just before being overtaken, Daphne pleaded to her father, the river god Pineios or Ladon and Gaia.

He changed her into a laurel tree, just before Apollo could reach her.
The laurel became sacred to Apollo and at the Pythian Games, which were held every four years in Delphi in honour of Apollo, the winners were crowned with a wreath of laurel gathered from Thessaly.



Apollo, the son of Zeus and Leto, a Titan’s daughter, was one of the most important and complex of the Olympian gods in Greek Mythology.
Apollo has been variously recognized as a God of light and the sun, truth and prophesy, healing, plague  and more.
He was the father of the famous musician Orpheus, to whom he gave a golden lyre and taught to play it.
 
As the leader of the Muses, he functioned as the patron god of music and poetry. The lyre created for him by Hermes became his attribute.
This painting shows him as the god of the sun, with his famous lyre, surrounded by muses and dolphins, the ultimate symbol of friendship.



Apollo, the son of Zeus and Leto (a Titan’s daughter), was one of the most important and complex of the Olympian gods in Greek mythology.
He has been variously recognised as a god of light and the sun, truth and prophesy, fertility, music, poetry etc.
He is also associated with medicine and healing, whether through the god himself or mediated through his son Asclepius. But at the same time Apollo was considered a god who could bring ill-health and deadly plague.
 
As the patron of Delphi, Apollo was the prophetic deity of the Delphic Oracle.
This painting shows him as Apollo Helios (god of the sun), fighting the Python who lived in a cave in Delphi, symbolising the battle between light and darkness (good and bad).


This painting shows the revolution of the people in Arab states for more democracy and freedom, represented by the Egyptian mythological fight between the brothers Osiris, the good one and Set, the evil one.
 
Set married his twin sister Nephtys.
His brother Osiris was married to his twin sister Isis. While on the right hand side of this painting the good god Osiris and his wife/sister lived in peace, harmony and prosperity, his brother , the bad god Set (on the left hand side) and his wife/sister lived in turmoil.

In this painting on the left hand side, the different dictators are shown, represented by the evil god Seth, while on the right hand side the people in search of democracy and freedom are represented by the good god Osiris.



Artemis (Roman: Diana) was the daughter of Zeus and Leto and she was the twin sister of Apollo.
She was the Hellenic goddess of the hunt, wild animals, nature, wilderness, childbirth, virginity, protector of young girls, bringing and relieving disease in women. The deer and the cypress were sacred to her. Her symbols included the golden bow and arrow, the hunting dog, the stag, and the moon.
All of her companions remained virgins, and Artemis guarded her own chastity.
 
Acteon saw the virgin goddess  naked in her sacred spring and tries to force himself on her. For this abuse of the goddess and all she represented, he is punished and changed into a stag, and subsequently killed by his own hunting dogs.
She is portrayed with two faces, expressing that nature can be beautiful, but also harsh in punishing those who abuse her.
 
This painting pictures Artemis as the Lady of Ephesus. At Ephesus in Ionia, nowadays Turkey, her temple became one of the Seven Wonders of the World. It was probably the best known center of her worship except for Delos. In an ancient sanctuary her cult image depicted the "Lady of Ephesus" adorned with multiple rounded breast like protuberances on her chest. They have been variously interpreted as multiple accessory breasts, grapes and pears.



Asclepius was the god of medicine and healing in ancient Greek religion. He used the healing ability of his holy snakes, which became his symbol.
 
He was the son of Apollo and Coronia (a Thessalian princess). His mother died in labor, but his father rescued the child by cutting him from her womb. This explains the name Asclepius, ‘to cut open’. Apollo carried the baby to the centaur Chiron, who raised and instructed him in the art of medicine.
 
Hades (God of the underworld) feared that Asclepius’ healing powers would cause lesser spirits of the dead to come to his kingdom and made his brother Zeus kill him with his thunderbolt. To prevent further feuds with his angered son Apollo, Zeus later resurrected Asclepius as a God.
 
The original Hippocratic oath began with: ‘I swear by Apollo the physician and by Asclepius and by Hygieia and Panacea (his two healing daughters) and by all the gods…..



Astarte originated from Phoenicia and was a symbol of fertility, sexuality and war.
Her attributes were the lion, the horse, the sphinx, the dove and a star within a circle, indicating the planet Venus (Greek: Aphrodite).
 
Astarte was accepted by the Greeks under the name of Aphrodite.
The island of Cyprus is one of Astarte’s greatest faith centers.









Athene is the goddess of wisdom, warfare, courage and inspiration.
Her attributes are the owl (symbol of wisdom) and the olive branch (symbol of peace and victory) . Though she is a goddess of war strategy, she preferred wisdom to settle conflicts.
 
She is the daughter of Zeus and Metis (goddess of crafty thought and wisdom).
After a prophecy that Metis would give birth to ’a god greater than he’, Zeus swallowed her. But she was already pregnant with Athene, who burst forth from his head, fully grown and dressed for war.
 
Athene competed with Poseidon to be the patron god of Athens. They would each give the Athenians one gift to choose from. Poseidon struck the ground with his trident and created a spring. This would give them a means of trade and water (which, unfortunately was undrinkable). Athene offered them the first domesticated olive tree, which provided wood, oil and food. The olive tree was chosen and with it Athene’s patronage.
 


A world egg or cosmic egg is a mythological motif found in the creation myths of many cultures and civilizations.
 
Typically, the cosmic egg is a beginning of some sort. The universe or some primordial being comes into existence by ‘hatching’ from the egg, starting life in all its variations










In Greek mythology, Dimitra (Demeter) is the goddess of the harvest, who presided over the grains and the fertility of the earth. She is the daughter of the Titans Cronus and Rhea. Her daughter by Zeus was Persephone, goddess of vegetation.
 
Demeter’s virgin daughter Persephone was abducted by Hades, god of the underworld, who made her Queen of his kingdom. Demeter searched for her ceaselessly, preoccupied with her loss and her grief. The seasons halted, all living things ceased to grow, then began to die.
Faced with the extinction of all life on earth, Zeus, Persephone’s father, sent his messenger Hermes to the underworld to bring his daughter back.
Zeus’ brother Hades agreed to release her for certain months every year, either during the dry Mediterranean summer, or the autumn and winter.
Persephone’s time in the underworld corresponds with the unfruitful seasons and her return to the upper world with springtime when everything comes back to life.



In Greek mythology Dionysos was the god of the grape harvest, winemaking and wine, of ritual madness and ecstasy.
He is portrayed as the son of Zeus and the mortal Semele, which makes him semi-divine or heroic.
He is a major popular figure and his festivals were the driving force behind the development of Greek theatre.
He is an example of a dying god. His central cult imagery shows his triumphant, disorderly arrival, as if from some unknown, uncivilized place. His procession is made up of wild female followers and satyrs.
City religions considered him the protector of those who do not belong to conventional society and thus symbolized every thing that is chaotic.



In this painting Greece is represented by a woman in shredded cloths, caused by the greed of certain of her population.
 
In the background, the faces of former Greek philanthropist, the ones that donated a.o. hospitals and schools. With in their midst Lord Byron, who even gave his life for the liberation of the country.
 
While Europe is trying to pull her out of the swamp, she is being pulled back by those whose greed is not yet fulfilled.




Their story concerns the overcoming of obstacles to the love between Eros (Latin Cupido, "Desire" or “ Love") and Psyche,("Soul", or “Butterfly) and their ultimate union in marriage.
Psyche was considered extremely beautiful. Her beauty and consequent suitors cause Aphrodite’s jealousy and she orders her son Eros to work her revenge. But Eros falls in love with her and desires to possess her for himself.
Aphrodite tries to prevent this marriage of her son with a beautiful mortal and obstructs wherever she can.
At last Eros takes his case to Zeus, who gives his consent in return for Eros’ future help whenever a choice maiden catches his eye. Zeus warns Aphrodite to back off, and gives Psyche ambrosia, the drink of immortality, so the couple can be united in marriage as equals. “The child born to the couple is Hedone ("Pleasure.").



In Greek mythology Europa was a beautiful Mesopotamian woman of high lineage. She represented all wisdom and civilization, which existed in her homeland and which was brought through her to Crete and from there into Europe. The name of the continent of Europe has ultimately been taken from her.
 
According to mythology, Zeus was enamored of her and decided to seduce her. He transformed himself into a tame white bull and mixed with her father’s herds. While Europa and her female attendants were gathering flowers, she saw the bull, caressed his flanks and eventually got onto his back. Zeus took the opportunity and ran to the sea and swam, with her on his back to the island of Crete. He then revealed his true identity, and Europa became the first Queen of Crete.
 
After arriving in Crete, Europa had three sons: Minos, the founder of the Minoan civilization; Rhadamanthus and Sarpedon. After their death, the three of them became the three judges of the underworld. According to mythology her sons were fathered by Zeus , who recreated later the shape of the white bull in the sky, which is now known as the constellation Taurus.



This painting shows an interpretation of Darwin’s theory on Evolution, which is kept in motion by the energizing power of light.










This painting shows the different seasons, with Apollo Helios (god of the sun) as the central entity.
It all starts with spring (twins in the uterus),
followed by summer (grapes growing), next autumn ( wine preparing with Dionysos, the god of wine)
and last winter (when all is dying).

 





In Greek mythology, Gaia ("land" or "earth"; also Gaea, or Ge) was the personification of the Earth, one of the Greek primordial deities.
 
Gaia was the great mother of all. She created and gave birth to the Earth and all the Universe; the heavenly gods, the Titans, and the Giants were born to her. The gods reigning over their classical pantheon were born from her union with Uranus (the sky), while the sea-gods were born from her union with Pontos (the sea).
Her equivalent in the Roman pantheon was Terra.



According to Greek mythology, Zeus had an affair with the mortal woman Alcmene. From their union, the hero Heracles was born. The goddess Hera, Zeus’ wife hated the child profoundly.
Fear of Hera's revenge led Alcmene to expose of the infant Heracles, but he was taken up and brought to Hera by his half-sister Athena, who played an important role as protectress of heroes.
Hera did not recognize Heracles and nursed him out of pity.
He suckled Hera’s  breast so strongly that he caused her pain, and she pushed him away. Her milk sprayed across the heavens and formed the Milky Way.


In Greek mythology, Ganymedes is a divine hero whose homeland was Troy. He was described as the most beautiful of mortals.
One day Ganymedes was  having a bath in the spring of Mount Ida. Zeus was looking down from  Mount Olympus at the naked youth and full of passion he transformed himself into an eagle and  flew down to abduct Ganymedes to Olympus to be his lover boy. There Zeus granted him eternal youth and immortality and the office of cupbearer to the Gods.
Ganymedes became a symbol of the beautiful young male who attracted homosexual desire and of the divine love between males.



The devotion of the Unknown god or Agnostos Theos is based on the theory that in addition to the twelve main Olympian gods and the innumerable lesser deities, other, till then unknown gods might exist, whose names and nature were not yet revealed to the ancient Greeks. So they worshipped a deity they called the Unknown God.
 
In Athens there was a temple specifically dedicated to the god. He was not so much a specific deity, but he represented any god or gods whose actual existence might be revealed in the future.


 
 



Hephaestus (Roman: Vulcan) was the Greek god of fire and volcanoes, metals, metallurgy technology, blacksmiths, craftsmen, artisans and sculptors.
 He is the son of Hera independently, as punishment for Zeus giving birth to Athena independently.
Hephaestus’ power was considered of physical nature in volcanic districts.
 
From his birth the god of fire was lame, which gave him a grotesque appearance. Therefore, his mother disliked him so much that she dropped him from Mount Olympus. But the marine divinities, Thetis and Eurynome received him and he lived with them for nine years in a cave, making for them a variety of ornaments.
During this period he created the golden chair, from which he would not release his mother, as punishment for her cruelty. Only when he was intoxicated with wine and taken back by Dionysus, he let her go.
Hephaestus was the only Olympian to have returned to Olympus after being exiled.
 
Zeus gave him the goddess Aphrodite as a bride, out of fear that her beauty and sexual attraction would cause unrest on Mount Olympus. This angered and saddened the goddess and caused her unstoppable infidelity to Hephaestus.


Heracles (Roman Hercules), a divine hero in Greek mythology, is the son of Zeus and Alcmene. Besides an Olympian champion, he was the god of heroes, sports and divine protector of mankind.
Driven mad by Hera, Heracles killed his own six sons. After recovering his sanity, he deeply regretted his actions and traveled to Delphi to inquire how to carry out his penance. The oracle advised him to live at Tyrins and serve King Eurystheus for 12 years, performing any labour he was ordered to. 
Eurytheus ordered Heracles to perform ten labours. After he completed these, the king ordered him two additional duties, for two out of ten were not performed properly. For the first one he had to steal the apples from the garden of the Hesperides. They were nymphs, who kept a garden with golden apples, not meant to be possessed by mortals.
Heracles first had to conquer Ladon, the dragon-like guardian of the apples. Thus paving the way to pick them and bring them to Eurystheus, who was furious that Heracles had accomplished a seemingly impossible task.



Heracles (Roman Hercules), a divine hero in Greek mythology, is the son of Zeus and Alcmene.
Besides an Olympian champion, he was the God of heroes, sports and divine protector of mankind.
 
Driven mad by Hera, who never stopped hating him, Heracles killed his own six sons. After recovering his sanity, he deeply regretted his actions and traveled to Delphi to inquire how to carry out his penance. The oracle advised him to live at Tyrins and serve King Eurystheus for 12 years, performing any labour he was ordered to.
 
The second one of these seemingly impossible duties was to conquer the nine headed Lernean Hydra. In Greek mythology, Hydra was an ancient nameless serpent-like water beast. It possessed reptilian traits with many heads (for each head cut off, two more would grow) and a poisonous breath, so virulent that even her tracks were deadly.
Its lair was the lake of Lerna. Beneath the waters was an entrance to the Underworld and the Hydra was its guardian.



Hermaphroditus, son of Hermes and Aphrodite in Greek mythology was fused with a nymph, Salmacis. This resulted in one individual possessing physical characteristics of both sexes.














Hermaphroditos was the son of Hermes and Aphrodite.
 
The nymph Salmacis fell desperately in love with the beautiful youth and begged the gods to be forever inseparable.
When he was bathing in a pond, she embraced him very tightly and the gods fused her with him.

This resulted in one individual possessing the physical characteristics of both sexes.







Hermes is an Olympian god, the great messenger of the gods in Greek mythology.
He is also the patron of the cunning of thieves, of commerce in general, of boundaries and the travelers who cross them. He has been described as the one of many shifts, blandly cunning, a robber and a thief at the gates. Due to his constant mobility, he was considered the god of commerce and social intercourse, the wealth brought in business. He protects and takes care of all travelers, miscreants, harlots, old crones and thieves that pray to him or cross his path.
 
In this painting Hermes’ own cunning is surpassed and he is being destroyed by bigger, better, more cunning thieves than even the god himself.



Hestia is a goddess of the first generation. She was the first child of the Titans Cronus and Rhea and sister to Demeter, Hera, Zeus, Poseidon and Hades. Immediately after their birth Cronus swallowed all but the last and youngest, Zeus. He forced his father to disgorge his siblings and led them in a war against Cronus and the other Titans. As ‘first to be swallowed and last to be thrown up again’, Hestia was both the youngest and the eldest daughter.
 
Her name means ‘home and hearth’, the household and its inhabitants. Her function was to feed and maintain the fires of the Olympian hearth. Her name and function shows the importance of the hearth and its fire in the social, religious and political life of ancient Greece: essential for warmth, food preparation and the completion of sacrificial offerings to the gods. Responsibility for Hestia’s domestic cult usually fell to the leading woman of the household.
 Just as the accidental or negligent extinction of a domestic hearth-fire represented a failure of domestic and religious care for the family, failure to maintain Hestia’s public fire was a breach of duty to the broad community.
 
Hestia swears herself to perpetual virginity. She thus rejects Aphrodite’s values and becomes, to some extent, her chaste, domestic complementary, or antithesis
 
In this personal family portrait Hestia is representing not only home and hearth, but fire and family, with children and grandchildren.




In ancient times (and still today) in many cultures priests, oracles,  shamans, consuming this specific mushroom made the user undertake a mind travel for 3 days to meet the ancestors and ask  them for answers to their questions










In Greek mythology, the Lernean Hydra was an ancient nameless serpent-like water beast.
It possessed reptilian traits with many heads (for each head cut off, two more would grow) and a poisonous breath, so virulent that even her tracks were deadly.
Its lair was the lake of Lerna. Beneath the waters was an entrance to the Underworld and the Hydra was its guardian.
In this painting it represents the actors of the inquisition, who, with the help of the worms (the aristocracy) stole the possessions of those who were convicted by this same inquisition.



In Greek Mythology the father of Icarus, Daedalus was commissioned by the Minoan king Minas to construct the famous labyrinth, from which nobody could escape.
After constructing this labyrinth, Daedalus was imprisoned by the king to prevent him from unveiling the secret of his creation. He decided on a way to escape for himself and his son by flying from the island of Crete, using a combination of feathers and beeswax for wings.
He warned his son not to fly too high as the sun would make the wax melt with disastrous  consequences.
Icarus, however, in his youthful arrogance, ignored his father’s warning and paid for it with his life.




In Greek Mythology the father of Icarus, Daedalus was commissioned by the Minoan king Minas to construct the famous labyrinth, from which nobody could escape.
After constructing this labyrinth, Daedalus was imprisoned by the king to prevent him from unveiling the secret of his creation. He decided on a way to escape for himself and his son by flying from the island of Crete, using a combination of feathers and beeswax for wings.
He warned his son not to fly too high as the sun would make the wax melt with disastrous  consequences . Icarus, however, in his youthful arrogance, ignored his father’s warning and decided to challenge the god of the sun Apollo and his chariot of fire. He paid for it with his life.



Leda and the Swan is a story from the Greek mythology in which Zeus, the King of gods, seduced Leda in the shape of a Swan on the same night she slept with her husband Tyndareus, King of Sparta.
 
Leda laid two eggs, from which hatched the children, Helen and Polydeuces, children of Zeus, and Castor and Clytemnestra, children of her husband Tyndareus.









The circle of life, from birth to death.

The miracle of new life, given by a mother, growth, the peak, and the aging process. It is all part of life.









Magic mushrooms are delicious and very nutricious











New life created to serve as food for the human sharks.










Medusa was a beautiful Gorgon, caught having sex with Poseidon in the temple of Athena. This angered the goddess and made her transform the Gorgon into the monster, known as Medusa, with the face of a hideous human female, having living venomous snakes in place of hair. Gazing directly upon her would turn onlookers to stone. She was beheaded by Perseus while looking at her reflection in the mirrored shield he received from Athena. During that time, Medusa was pregnant by Poseidon. When Perseus beheaded her, Pegasus, the winged horse, sprang from her body.  In this painting Medusa symbolises the wild growth of capitalism, crushing people globally, resulting in their uprise to bring forth the beheading of unlimited capitalism through the sword of Perseus.



n Greek Mythology,, the Moires often known in English as the Fates—were the white-robed incarnations of  destiny.
They controlled the metaphorical thread of life of every mortal from birth to death.

They were independent, directed fate, and watched that the fate assigned to every being takes its course without obstruction. Both gods and men had to submit to them.

Their names were:

  • Clotho– "spinner". She spun the thread of life from her distaff onto her spindle
  • Lachesis– "allotter" or drawer of lots, measured the thread of life allotted to each person with her measuring rod
  • Atropos– "inexorable" or "inevitable", was the cutter of the thread of life. She chose the manner of each person's death; and when their time was come, she cut their life-thread with her abhorred shear
  • In this painting the three Moires represent the role and unquestioned power of rating agencies to control the destiny of individual entities (in this case whole countries)




In Greek mythology, Narcissus was a hunter who was known for his beauty. He was the son of the river god Cephissus and nymph Liriope. He was proud, in that he disdained those who loved him. Nemesis noticed this behavior and attracted Narcissus to a pool, where he saw his own reflection in the water and fell in love with it, not realizing it was merely an image. Unable to leave the beauty of his reflection, Narcissus drowned. Narcissus is the origin of the term narcissism, a fixation with oneself.
Multiple versions of the myth have survived from ancient sources.

A lesser known version of the myth by Pausanius describes the love between Narcissus and his twin sister, whose death, he could not overcome. When he bent over to the pool to drink some water, he saw his own reflection in the water, but thought it was the image of his beloved sister. When he realised he could never be reunited with her, he was inconsolably, could not distract himself from the image and died from lack of food.
The gods, out of pity transformed him into the flower we all know: the Narcissus.




In Greek mythology Odysseus started his Odyssey to return home to the island of Ithaca, 10 years after the end of the 10-year Trojan War.
One of the many perils he had to overcome was his encounter with the Sirens. They were dangerous and beautiful creatures, portrayed as femmes fatales who lured nearby sailors with their enchanting music and voices, to shipwreck on the rocky coast of their island. To avoid being shipwrecked and in order to escape from the Sirens, all sailors had their ears plugged up with beeswax, except for Odysseus, who was tied to the mast as he wanted to hear their song. This caused him to experience forceful hallucinations.




This painting represents the perilous journey millions of sperms must undertake, in order to reach the desired egg and to create new life.












Orpheus was a legendary musician, poet and prophet in Greek mythology.
He was the son of Apollo, the God of music and the muse Calliope. Apollo gave Orpheus a golden lyre and taught him to play it. Orpheus mother Calliope taught him to make verses for singing.
 
The most famous story in which Orpheus figures is that of his wife Eurydice. While walking in tall grass at her wedding, she was trying to escape from a Satyr. She fell into a nest of vipers and suffered a fatal bite in her heel. Orpheus discovered her dead body and, overcome with grief, took the advice of the Gods and traveled with her to the underworld.
With his music and helped by Hermes, he softened the hearts of Persephone and Hades (the underworld’s ruler) and they allowed Eurydice to return with him to earth on one condition: he should walk in front of her and not look back until they both had reached the upper world.
He set off, with Eurydice following, but in his anxiety, as soon as he reached the upper world, he turned to look at her, forgetting that both needed to be in the upper world. She vanished for the second time, but now forever

Orpheus; 100 x 80 cm.

Orpheus was a legendary musician, poet and prophet in Greek mythology.
He was the son of Apollo, the god of music and the muse Calliope. Apollo gave Orpheus a golden lyre and taught him to play it. His mother Calliope taught him to make verses for singing.
 
Here he is portrayed, singing and playing at the festival in honour of Dionyssos, the god of wine and dance and every creature in the forest had  to come and listen to him play.
Orpheus was brutally killed by the Maenads, out of jealousy, because after the loss of his love Eurydice, he lost interest in all women. They were a group of female followers of Dionysos, who punished them severely for this act of violence.




Uranus, or Ouranos meaning sky or heaven was the primal Greek god personifying the sky. Uranus, or Father Sky was the son and husband of Gaia, Mother Earth. Uranus and Gaia were the parents of the first generation of Titans and the ancestors of most of the Greek Gods.
 
In the Olympian creation myth, Uranus came every night to cover the earth and mate with Gaia, but he hated the children she bore him. He imprisoned the children in Tartarus, deep within earth, where they caused pain to Gaia. She shaped a great flint-bladed sickle and asked her sons to castrate Uranus. Only Cronus, youngest and most ambitious of the Titans, was willing. He ambushed his father and castrated him, casting the severed testicles into the sea.
From the genitals in the sea came forth Aphrodite.




In Greek mythology, Pandora was the first woman on earth. Zeus ordered Hephaestus, the god of craftsmanship, to create her and so he did, by using water and earth. The Gods offered her many gifts: Athene gave her clothes, Aphrodite beauty and Hermes speech.
 
When Prometheus stole fire from the gods, Zeus took revenge by presenting Pandora to Prometheus brother Epimetheus. For dowry Pandora was given a beautiful box, which she was not to open under any circumstance. Driven by curiosity, given to her by the gods, Pandora opened it and all evil it contained escaped and spread all over the world. She quickly closed the lid, but the whole content had escaped, except for one thing that laid at the bottom: the Angel of Hope.
Pandora was deeply saddened by what she had done and afraid that she would have to face Zeus’ anger, since she had failed her duty. But Zeus did not punish Pandora, because he had wanted this to happen.
Today to open Pandora’s box means to create evil that cannot be undone.



According to Greek mythology, Zeus held a banquet in celebration of the marriage of Peleus and Thetis (parents of Achilles). But Eris, goddess of conflict was not invited, for she would have ruined the party. Angered by this snub, she arrived at the celebration with a golden apple from the garden of the Hesperides, which she threw into the proceedings, upon which was the inscription:”for the fairest one".
Three goddesses claimed the apple: Hera, Athena and Aphrodite. They asked Zeus to judge which of them was the fairest and he, reluctant to favour anyone himself, declared that Paris, a Trojan mortal, would judge their cases, for he had shown his exemplary fairness in an contest with the god Ares.
 
Guided by Hermes, the three candidates, portrayed as barbies, bathed in the spring of Ida, then, undressed and naked confronted Paris, hoping to appear more sexual than the other two. During the inspection, each attempted with their powers to bribe him: Hera offered him the kingdom of Europe and Asia; Athena wisdom and skill in war; and Aphrodite the world’s most beautiful woman, Helen of Sparta, wife of the Greek king Menelaus. Paris accepted Aphrodite’s gift and gave her the apple, which got him Helen as well as the enmity of the Greeks. The Greeks’ expedition to retrieve Helen from Paris in Troy is the mythological basis of the Trojan War.



Pegasus is one of the best known fantastical as well as mythological creatures in Greek mythology.
He is a winged divine horse, usually shown as white coloured. His father was Poseidon, god of the sea, who had sexual intercourse with his mother, the mermaid Medusa on the floor of a temple to Athena. This angered the goddess, who changed Medusa into a monster.
Later, when the hero Perseus beheaded her, Pegasus emerged from her neck.
 
Pegasus, with Athene on his back traveled to Olympus, where he was stabled with Zeus’ other steeds and was given the task of carrying Zeus’ thunderbolts.
For his faithful service  he was honoured with transformation into a constellation.
 In this painting he is shown, trying in vain to escape from the computerized world, to which he is unwillingly bound.


Persephone, in Greek mythology, the goddess of vegetation, has been abducted by Hades, King of the Underworld. Her mother, Dimitra, goddess of the harvest, sets nature at a stop. All living things start to die. To save the earth Hades lets Persephone go for a period of six months. Thus every spring and summer, nature is being restored.
 
This painting represents Persephone, whose life bringing powers are being sacrificed in order to keep the consumption of the world at an unnecessary high level.
Her cross is constructed from huge factory chimneys.





In Greek mythology Phaethon was the son of the Oceanid Clymene and Apollo, god of the sun or Helios.
Phaethon, challenged by his playmates, sought assurance from his mother that his father really was the god of the sun. She gave him the requested assurance and told him to turn to his father for confirmation. He asked his father for some proof that would demonstrate his relationship with the sun. When Apollo promised to grant him whatever he wanted, he insisted on being allowed to drive the sun chariot for a day. His father tried to talk him out of it, by mentioning that not even Zeus, the king of gods, could drive this chariot, but Phaeton insisted.
With Phaeton at the reigns of the chariot, the horses felt a weaker person in charge and he was unable to control them. The earth was in danger of being burnt and, to prevent this disaster, Zeus killed him with a thunderbolt.



A Phoenix is a mythical bird with a colorful plumage and a tail of gold and scarlet, according to some legends. It has a 500 to 1000 year life-cycle, near the end of which it builds itself a nest of twigs that then ignites. Both nest and bird burn fiercely and are reduced to ashes, from which a new young Phoenix or Phoenix egg arises, reborn anew to live again.
 
The new Phoenix is destined to live as long as it’s old self. The Phoenix’s ability to be reborn from it’s own ashes implies that it is immortal.






This painting shows the causes and disastrous effects of worldwide pollution.
 
Factory chimneys like sickles of death with in the background the remaining skull of the sun.







Poseidon was a son of the Titans Cronus and Rhea. He, like his brothers and sisters, was swallowed by Cronus at birth, but later they were all saved by his brother Zeus, whom his mother had hidden among a flock of sheep.
 
When the world was divided by lot in three, Zeus received the sky, Hades the underworld and Poseidon the sea.
 
Poseidon competed with Athene to be the patron god of Athens. They would each give the Athenians one gift to choose from. Poseidon struck the ground with his trident and created a spring. This would give them a means of trade and water (which, unfortunately was salty and undrinkable). Athene offered them the first domesticated olive tree, which provided wood, oil and food. The olive tree was chosen and with it Athene’s patronage.
 
Infuriated at his loss, Poseidon sent a monstrous flood to the Attic Plain, to punish the Athenians for not choosing him.



Prometheus is a Titan, the son of Lapetus and Clymene, and brother to Atlas
 
Prometheus played a trick against Zeus: At a sacrificial meal marking ‘the settling of accounts’ between mortals and immortals, he placed two sacrificial offerings before the Olympian;
A selection of beef hidden inside an ox’s stomach (good food hidden inside an unattractive exterior), and the bull’s bones wrapped completely in glistening fat (something inedible hidden inside an attractive exterior). Zeus chose the latter, setting a precedent for future sacrifices.
 
From then onwards, humans would keep the meat for themselves and burn the bones wrapped in fat as an offering to the gods. This irritated Zeus, who kept his fire from humans in retribution.
Prometheus in turn, stole fire from the gods and gave it back to mankind, which angered Zeus enormously and caused his severe punishment of Prometheus.



Prometheus is a Titan, the son of Lapetus and Clymene and brother to Atlas.
 
According to Greek mythology, he created mankind from earth and his life-giving tears.
In addition he gave humans fire, which he stole from the gods after Zeus withheld it from them. Prometheus claims furthermore to have taught them the art of civilization, such as writing, mathematics, agriculture, medicine and science. The Titan’s greatest benefaction for mankind seems to have saved them from complete destruction.
 
This painting represents Prometheus with all good people rising up toOmega
( = perfection) and the bad ones stay in darkness in the underworld. Here represented by the bombardment of Gaza. After all his benefaction to the human race, Prometheus is totally appalled at the outcome of his interference.
 


Selene, goddess of the moon, was the daughter of the Titans Hyperion and Theia and sister to Helios, god of the sun.
 
After Helios finishes his journey across the sky, Selene freshly washed in the waters of earth-circling Oceanus, begins her own journey as night falls upon earth. The radiance of her immortal head and golden crown light the earth during her voyage.
 
Endymion, her lover, was so handsome that she asked Zeus to grant him eternal sleep, so that he would forever stay young and thus never leave her. Every night Selene slipped down behind Mount Latmus to visit him and give birth to their 50 famously beautiful daughters.
Though the story of Endymion is the best-known one today, Selene also had a daughter with Zeus, Pandia (all bright), goddess of the full moon.


Temptations can be found at all times and places.









Time is not only money as many materialists think, it is much more than that.



































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